Legal Topics

Prior to 1995, the United States Congress and its associated agencies in the legislative branch were exempt from the various civil rights, labor, and workplace safety and health laws that protected employees who worked in the private sector and in the federal government. In 1995, the 104th United States Congress passed the...
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded education programs and activities. Title IX protections extend to both students and employees. If you feel that you or your child is being discriminated against based on your sex by an educational institution that...
In 1938 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), 29 U.S.C. § 201 et seq., into law, he characterized it as “the most far-reaching, far-sighted program for the benefit of workers ever adopted in this or any other country.” Over 70 years later, the FLSA remains the centerpiece of U.S....
On January 29, 2009, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (“Act”), superseding the Supreme Court’s decision in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Inc., 550 U.S. 618 (2007). Ledbetter had required a compensation discrimination charge to be filed within 180 days of an employer’s decision...
During periods of economic downturn, employers, desperate to cut costs, may attempt to terminate their employees who have medical conditions or have family members who have medical conditions and are insured through the employer in order to cut back on insurance or pension costs.
A non-compete agreement is a type of “restrictive covenant” generally used by employers to limit an employee’s freedom to pursue a similar profession if and when the employment relationship ends. The non-compete is one of a variety of contracts or agreements an employee may be asked to sign by his or her employer, and these...
The Troubled Asset Relief Program (“TARP”), also commonly referred to as “the bailout,” came amidst perhaps the most serious banking and mortgage crisis in the country’s history.  While the debate continues over the success and wisdom of the measures taken by the government to prevent the collapse of the financial industry, one...
In response to the accounting scandals at Enron and Worldcom that caused huge losses to shareholders and spawned a crisis in investor confidence, the U.S. Congress passed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002. “SOX,” as it is popularly known, requires publicly traded companies to make certifications about their financial conditions,...
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, signed into law by President Barack Obama on February 17, 2009, provided an unprecedented $787 billion federal spending package intended to stimulate the flagging U.S. economy. Congress included important provisions in the bill to ensure oversight and accountability of the...
In August 2007, President Bush signed The Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (“9/11 Act”). The 9/11 Act included amendments to the Federal Rail Safety Act (“FRSA”), 49 U.S.C. § 20109, which was designed to enhance and protect railroad safety. The amendments sought to expand whistleblower...

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